Continuum Exhibition Opening

Emma Rogers
Media Intern

September 21st marked the opening of DOMA’s newest special exhibition, Continuum: The Art of Michael Dunbar in the Sculptural Tradition, featuring the work of Midwest sculptor Michael Dunbar. Guests gathered to hear the artist speak about his monumental body of work, including several Machinist Studies that are included in the exhibition. Continuum also features several examples from DOMA’s collection that represent the history of sculpture, providing a comparison between the artist’s contemporary style and historic movements. View Continuum in the special exhibition gallery on the second level of the museum between now and December 22nd, 2016.

Continuum: Behind the Scenes from David Owsley Museum of Art on Vimeo.

Pokébash 2016

Daniel Combs
Education Intern

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Could Pokémon Go and a social event at DOMA coexist? What would the outcome be? We gained a bit of a taste of what would result from such a social experiment on Friday, August 26 at PokéBash. Before the official start time at 5 p.m. people were already starting to approach and enter the large wooden doors of DOMA. From the beginning, you could tell this wasn’t going to be just like any other art museum event. Many people mentioned their admiration of the integration between the artistic atmosphere and the mobile game. Even with the overwhelming sense of individual technology usage, people were still engaged with one another and even helping one another with aspects of their gaming.

There were plenty of fun activities besides the Pokémon lures lined up for students that made time away from their studies. Plenty of visitors took advantage of the free giveaways offered inside the doors such as mobile phone stands, posters, and more. There were coloring tables with crayons and coloring pages of Pokémon characters and art inspired by the DOMA collection. On the stairs, a photo booth allowed 2016-8-26_QuadBash_15people to be creative with putting themselves within a picture frame and act as goofy or serious as they like with various accessories and masks. Kailey and Aaron were first time visitors to the museum. “It was a great time and it was a beautiful building. There were great crafts to release tension after all the class work. It was much needed down time. We are definitely coming back again,” they said.

There was a constant flow of over 300 people coming in and playing their games, and many ventured off to explore the collection. With over 11,000 priceless artifacts, DOMA is full of treasures and inspiration. Ashley Douglas, a junior from Ivy Tech said, “the event was a whole lot of fun! The Pokémon theme and museum is a good combo. I’ll be coming back after my first visit.”

2016-8-26_QuadBash_41At 6 p.m. things filtered to the outdoor activities of the Quad, where lines of excited students rushed to do mandala-inspired rock painting provided by DOMA, get henna tattoos, climb a rock wall, eat free pizza and Insomnia cookies, or listen to live music. Several attendees spoke of how they believed social media, personal gaming with phones and handheld devices has become such a common scene.

As the event closed you could see people humming away at songs they heard from the band, dancing, laughing or talking about what the next event might be. Who knows for sure what is to come from the journey of life through the rest of the semester? One thing is for sure; there were memories made for many at the PokéBash. Many will look back at the event and remember the smell of the food, the goofy picture they took on the stairwell in front of the Buddha statue, coloring pages at the tables, the free poster that will hang in the dorm room for the next year or so, live music or the other outdoor activities. Who knows what the next cultural phase will be? Will people still be chasing imaginary digital creatures on their phones? We’ll see what’s in store at the next Quad Bash.

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Photos by: Emma Rogers

Behind the Scenes Art in Bloom 2016

Sierra Trowbridge
Education Intern

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May 20th-22nd, the David Owsley Museum of Art hosted its second Art in Bloom, an event in which six florists are invited to create a floral arrangement inspired by a work of art in the museum. I attended the opening reception on Friday, May 20th. I do not think I have ever seen so many different and strange flowers in one place. Nevertheless, each florist was able to take materials of their own choosing and create an arrangement that brought out elements of the artwork as well as adding personal interpretation that made each piece unique and exciting. Seeing everything and everyone come together and transform the museum into a floral paradise filled with guests was something spectacular.

DSC_0125For my part, I was privileged to help a talented local florist, Jackie Turner from the Flower Bin Inc., put her arrangement together. Not that I got to play with any flowers, but when she needed something I made sure she had it and I drove the cart holding her flowers and vases with the utmost care. My favorite aspect of helping, though, was asking questions. Jackie Turner is probably one of the friendliest people I have ever met, and was more that willing to talk all about her flowers.  She loves tropical flowers, a fact evident throughout her arrangement. When I asked her what the most difficult part of putting her work together was, her immediate response was the color. The textile art work she took inspiration from, Mariska Karasz’s Equilibrium, had a lot of muted colors; browns and somewhat dull reds, yellows, and oranges. Fall colors that are a might bit difficult to find in the spring. She found her inspiration, though, and forged ahead with a plan to incorporate those colors and the textures within the tapestry, resulting in a beautifully dynamic arrangement.

Now, when I was helping Jackie and providing assistance in other aspects of preparation during the day, it was more of a behind the scenes kind of adventure. When the guests arrived, all of a sudden the hard work everyone had put in was on view. It was fantastic. People wandered all around the galleries making conversation, appreciating the flowers. I got to talk to brilliant people I would never have come in contact with. Greeting people, checking them in, answering their questions in the galleries; all of that went into making sure they had the best time we could provide. The fact that I was able to help in that goal is an experience I will not soon forget, and hopefully, our guests remember their evening among the flowers as fondly as we do.

View more images from Art in Bloom 2016 at our Facebook page!

New Perspectives on Gender-Based Violence Brought to Life at the Opening Night of Neda Wants to Die

Ashley Vandervelde
Collections Intern

1 in 3: What Does it Take For You to be Outraged? As curated by the World Bank, was designed to be an educational format for the issue of gender-based violence (GBV). The World Bank brought together a large body of fine art, but also wanted to include the theatrical arts to humanize the issues and connect with audiences. Neda Wants to Die: How Thin is the Line Between Perpetrators and Victims? as written by playwright Luigi Laraia is a dramatic one-act play to describe the different perspectives and roles of victims, perpetrators, and social workers/officers affected by sexual GBV in a conflict-ridden country. The vagueness of the setting is intentional to push the idea that GBV does not just happen in a few areas of the world. It is a worldwide pandemic and one that we have yet to find the best way to solve it and promote peace.

unspecifiedNeda Want to Die sets out to help change the public’s understanding of GBV. John, a United Nations High Commission for Refugees officer as played by Dr. Richard Tanenbaum (a psychologist in his daily life), takes the role of the countless people worldwide who seek to control and ultimately stop the rates of GBV. His character has given up his life to commit to helping refugees seeking asylum. Karen Elle takes on the role of Neda, a woman who has come to UNHCR office to seek help and care for her unborn child, and to help escape her abuser. Laurent is a fruit salesman who is running from the ongoing war and who seeks protection services that John might offer. His character, played by Sean Gabbert, is a title character that changes the audience’s perspectives on GBV and gives the viewer a heart-wrenching twist as to the potential source and root cause of this violence . The actors gave an emotional and impactful performance that had audience members riveted.

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(left to right) John, Neda, and Laurent interacting and building the plotline during their first appearances on the stage.

The performance was followed by a panel discussion with the playwright, the members of the cast, and three individuals from the community who work to help control GBV. Jim Duckham, the chief of police at Ball State University, informed audience members about how much has changed in favor of the victims of sexual crimes in the last 30 years. Chief Duckham said, “The vocabulary has changed, we no longer address them as victims, but survivors”. At Ball State, he and the other campus officers are reaching out to the women in a softer way. Events like “Lunch with a Cop” are meant to help students not feel threatened by the presence of the law enforcement, but to help create a better basis of trust, so that should individuals encounter violence, they can comfortably seek out the law for help and not remain silent.katie

Likewise, Katie Slabaugh, Associate Dean of Students and Title IX Coordinator for Ball State University, spoke out about her position to help those who seek care after a sexual crime, such as an assault or stalking. Ms. Slabaugh was touched by the dialogue of the play and mentioned that some of the script moved her in such a way because it related to the things she hears from survivors on a regular basis.

Teresa Clemmons, Executive Director of A Better Way Services in Muncie, gave her perspective on what it is like to be an advocate in our community. She is proud to say that, “Our community is more proactive than most”. We have places where survivors of sexual violence can seek refuge including emergency shelter and counseling services. She regretfully claims that even though we have these resources the problem is not that simply resolved. John’s character once mentions in Neda Wants to Die, “I’m employable forever”. That dialogue struck a chord in her. Ms. Clemmons has worked fighting GBV for 20 years and she says that it “frustrates me that we haven’t solved the problem.” However, she noted that steps forward have been made and she is honored to have been a part of it. Her words of hope for the future of controlling GBV were not only caring and sincere, but also personally uplifting.

The impact of 1 in 3 engrained in me a new awareness for how this kind of violence exists all across the globe. Having seen Neda Wants to Die, my perspectives have been broadened even further. I can personally say that I now have a more profound sense of every party involved in controlling GBV. I have also been enlightened to the roles of the perpetrator and victim, and the multiple ways they can exist. But I am also considering my community and how grateful I am to know that there are numerous resources in the Muncie area. This theatrical portion of the exhibition was a valuable supplement and will not always be shown alongside 1 in 3. It gave me a new window of awareness and understanding. If I had not attended, I would have regretted not having the opportunity to see it. I hope every community is able to have the same experience of seeing the play—my world is better for it.

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(Left to Right) Dr. Robert LaFrance, Karen Elle, Dr. Richard Tanenbaum, Luigi Laraia, Tania Said, Sean Gabbert, and Karin Orr

What’s Happening in April

What’s Happening in April at DOMA

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The Counseling Center Presents Meditation in the Museum
Friday | April 1 at 3:30 pm
RSVP not necessary, simply stop by. This is a free activity. Recommendation: Bring a towel, blanket or a yoga mat as this activity involves sitting on the floor.
Meditation in the Museum is a program series presented by the Counseling Center with the support of the David Owsley Museum of Art. With questions about the program please feel free to contact Dr. Hodorek at sphodorek@bsu.edu

12593991_1032223403485641_3682281564110124946_oDocent’s Choice Tour: 1 in 3: What Does It Take for You to Be Outraged
Saturday | April 2 at 2:30 pm
Docent Kyrra Clevenger will lead a tour that discusses the museum’s current exhibition, 1 in 3. Focusing on gender based violence, Clevenger will inform patrons on the works of art on display in this important and illuminating exhibition.

George Wolfe Leads Meditation in the Museum
Friday | April 8 at 3:30 pm
Silent Meditation sessions are conducted by George Wolfe, Professor Emeritus and former director of the BSU Center for Peace and Conflict Resolution. This week’s meditation is titled “Practicing Tapasya: transforming anger into positive energy.” These sessions last 45 minutes. Meet in the Owsley Asian Art Gallery in front of the Amidha Buddha. Chairs provided; bring a towel, mat, or blanket, if desired.

Decorative Arts and Contemporary Craft TourIMG_3898
Saturday | April 9 at 2:30 pm
Taking place in the Pruis Gallery, docent Rich Ruh will lead a tour discussing the decorative arts and contemporary crafts that are on display at the David Owsley Museum of Art.

Exploring Social Issues through Dance and Art with Audra Sokol
Wednesday | April 13 at 12:00 pm
Through a Virginia Ball Center for Creative Inquiry seminar, Professor Sokol and her students are using dance and theatre to explore the connections between standards of beauty, objectivication, and acts of violence in our culture through this discussion titled, “Exploring Social Issues through Dance and Art with Audra Sokol.” The spring 2016 special exhibition “1 in 3,” developed by the World Bank, offers inspiration as well.
The seminar’s community sponsors are A Better Way and Muncie Civic Theatre.
Taking place in the Alumni Center, Meeting Room 2

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Neda Wants to Die
Thursday & Friday | April 14 & 15 at 6:00 pm
In conjunction with the special exhibition, “1 in 3: What Does It Take for You to Be Outraged?”, see the play that was commissioned by the World Bank.
War rages on. Neda and Laurent need help. Joh, a United Nations officer, collects their stories. He needs to act fast to save them. How much are they willing to share? How far will John go to save them?
A panel discussion follows the performance.
Co-sponsored by the Multicultural Center
Recommended for adults due to strong language
Fine Arts Building, Recital Hall

12509624_1033566713351310_8049107388146626245_nThe Counseling Center Presents Meditation in the Museum
Friday | April 15 at 3:30 pm
This week’s meditation will center around coloring meditation with music.
RSVP not necessary, simply stop by. This is a free activity. Recommendation: Bring a towel, blanket or a yoga mat as this activity involves sitting on the floor.
Meditation in the Museum is a program series presented by the Counseling Center with the support of the David Owsley Museum of Art. With questions about the program please feel free to contact Dr. Hodorek at sphodorek@bsu.edu

Docent’s Choice Tour: Indiana Art
Saturday | April 16 at 2:30 pm
Docent Faith Gorrell leads a tour discussing the Indiana art that is on display at DOMA.

George Wolfe Leads Meditation in the Museum
Friday | April 22 at 3:30 pm
Silent Meditation sessions are conducted by George Wolfe, Professor Emeritus and former director of the BSU Center for Peace and Conflict Resolution. This week’s meditation is titled “Liberation From Past Impressions.” These sessions last 45 minutes. Meet in the Owsley Asian Art Gallery in front of the Amidha Buddha. Chairs provided; bring a towel, mat, or blanket, if desired.IMG_3911

Docent’s Choice Tour: Sculpture Court
Saturday | April 23 at 2:30 pm
Docent Charlie Schaefer leads a tour discussing the works of art on display in the Sculpture Court at DOMA.

Participants will have the chance to tour the exhibition with a staff member and then attend a healing touch workshop led by Peggy Farrer, a registered nurse liaison for St. Vincent Home Health and Hospice, and certified apprentice for Healing Touch International. The after-program’s goal is to restore harmony and balance in the energy system, facilitating visitors’ self-healing process.
$5 per participant; free for Friends members and BSU students
Register online!
Weather permitting, this week’s meditation will center around walking meditation.
RSVP not necessary, simply stop by. This is a free activity. Recommendation: Bring a towel, blanket or a yoga mat as this activity involves sitting on the floor.
Meditation in the Museum is a program series presented by the Counseling Center with the support of the David Owsley Museum of Art. With questions about the program please feel free to contact Dr. Hodorek at sphodorek@bsu.edu.
Final Friday: Censorship
Friday | April 29 at 6:00 pm
MCs Braydee Euliss and Traci Lutton introduce PechaKucha talks to Muncie to highlight what is creative and cool about the area. Stay to enjoy music by DJNELL, refreshments, cash bar, artist demonstration, art, and more.